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oluseyi
    @cgiffard I don't think consumer tech is just a matter of fashion; it's a matter of becoming an integrated solution that fits peoples lives, and everything cascades out from there.
    oluseyi
      @cgiffard I think that Apple transitioned *first*, beginning with the first iMac's industrial design and choices not to include a floppy drive, for instance. The iPod followed, less spec-heavy than MP3 players of the time, but better integrated.
      oluseyi
        @cgiffard The argument is that pure tech companies are no longer *prominent* the way they were in the 90s and early 00s—that they now serve niches of little interest to most, and that our former popular "tech companies" are now consumer products companies.
        oluseyi
          @cgiffard Yes, the comment was hyperbolic, for effect. But the real point is that pure tech companies no longer command the public imagination. Those "tech" companies that still do have transitioned into new core businesses.
          oluseyi
            @cgiffard Yes, but they don't drive anything, either. The shape of the industrial iron segment isn't shaped so much by the Xeon roadmap as by software to handle virtualization and massive parallelism, no?
            oluseyi
              @cgiffard An inversion occurred about 10 years ago where consumer technology eclipsed enterprise in volume and profitability, and that's never going back. It's also when corporate IT departments lost a lot of their organizational power (BYOD, etc.)
              oluseyi
                @cgiffard Well, yes, these comments primarily focus on consumer technology, because that's what gets all the hype and the headlines. But even for enterprise technology, pure "tech" companies no longer set the agenda. Intel follows Apple, now.
                oluseyi
                  @jws Heheh. »rueful smile«
                  oluseyi
                    @jws It caused us some other problems when deciding to present local timezones to South American users, due to logic regressions. The proper fix is to have our back end accept day-start and day-stop coords in UTC—but that's a BIG change. @thedan84 @dasdom
                    oluseyi
                      @jws Yeah. We actually have a legacy treatment of forcing users outside the US to EST, because we don't want to deal with scheduled games on one "day" spanning multiple days internationally. @thedan84 @dasdom
                      oluseyi
                        @literary Eventually, it's unavoidable. All online communities eventually die. We hope that it's as long as possible from now.
                        oluseyi
                          @jws UTC-as-string, so long as your strong formats are consistent between client(s) and server(s). @thedan84 @dasdom
                          oluseyi
                            @jws Ugh. Don't remind me. Dealing with date foolishness was one of the biggest hassles of our recent localization push. @thedan84 @dasdom
                            oluseyi
                              @sgtstretch As a consequence, I can't make it my primary independent project, which stretches the development time even longer.
                              oluseyi
                                @sgtstretch The challenge is figuring out profitability off a small but passionate base. Most developer models are predicated on scale. Even I, the aforementioned developer of the iOS/Android/Mac client, [alpha.app.net] am unsure about what sort of ROI it will eke out.
                                oluseyi
                                  @thedan84 NSJSONSerialization [developer.apple.com] + NSURLSession.dataTaskWithRequest(_: completionHandler:) [developer.apple.com] is easily 50% of the work of dealing with JSON APIs in Objective-C or Swift. @dasdom
                                  oluseyi
                                    @johngordon Aww, man. Yeah, same kind of angst.
                                    oluseyi
                                      @berg Thanks for your hard work! We get really antsy whenever ADN goes down, fretting over whether it'll come back :-) @johngordon @clarkgoble @larand @phoneboy @ronnie
                                      oluseyi
                                        @svogt Great question. The answer is that none of them is particularly influential on the directions in which the tech industry evolves, or has much mindshare with the public. Even Intel is not as powerful as it once was, as software has eclipsed hardware.