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duerig
    @johngordon I wonder if this is because tablets turned out to be a different market than we thought. Instead of 'large, portable, touch screen computer', they are 'portable tv screens'. The latter is a much simpler and cheaper device.
    duerig
      Perhaps the Earth's defenses would have been overwhelmed, but it should have been because there weren't enough numbers, not because they were absolutely useless. And they should have avoided the cliche of 'evil forces have single point of failure'.
      duerig
        They should have continued the story of Independence Day. Maybe there would have been another invasion, but instead of an unsuspecting populace dying in masses, there should have been orderly evacuation to bomb shelters at the first hint of danger.
        duerig
          They hit almost all of the same 'disaster movie' moments with the second one as with the first. And it just didn't make sense. The reason why people loved The Empire Strikes Back is that it continued a story instead of replaying the same beats.
          duerig
            I saw both Independence Day and the sequel last night. And I think that the main problem with 'resurgence' was that they couldn't decide whether to do a sequel or a remake. And so it ended up half and half.
            duerig
              @oluseyi Whoah. I just realized that I said 'best case is that it will be like New Jersey'. Let me take that back. I'm pretty sure there was a South Park episode where they showed New Jersey taking over the world and it was truly frightening. :)
              duerig
                @oluseyi I suppose it depends on how the economy develops between now and then. If the Nigerian economy really booms, it could end up like a kind of New Jersey. Maybe it'd import food, but lots of places do. OTOH, if it stagnates that would be awful.
                duerig
                  @oluseyi I read recently that based on UN projections for population, Nigeria will be have quite a few more people than China by 2100. Which boggles my mind. @clarkgoble
                  duerig
                    @johngordon I was reading a book recently which talked about how Colombus sailed at the dawn of printing. That he was among the first generation or two where even non-princes could afford to have a private library.
                    duerig
                      @johngordon One lesson I learned about tech from reading 'The Box' is that it is only really useful when the world changes to adapt to it. Even the printing press was only gradually more useful over time as literacy increased, for example.
                      duerig
                        @johngordon Or you could argue that it was just another kind of PDA. That it took PDAs a few decades to become really useful and common. Just like it took that long for televisions to become useful and common. And iPhone was just inflection point.
                        duerig
                          @johngordon For instance, you could argue that the iPhone was transformative. That it launched a category of device that took over the world in just a few years and changed how everyone interacts with it.
                          duerig
                            @johngordon For most tech, you can typically slant it either way. Emphasizing either how big of a change it was or emphasizing continuity. The only exception to this rule is the washing machine. Now that was a real revolution. Nothing else comes close. :)
                            duerig
                              @johngordon OTOH, it is also easy to overstate how rapid new technologies actually spread. I'm still blown away by the fact that at the start of WW2, the German army had more horses than tanks.
                              duerig
                                @johngordon It is often hard to really grasp how fast things were changing in the past. It is reasonable to argue, for example, that sanitation systems, running water, washing machines, and electricity made a bigger impact on living than Internet/Mobile.
                                duerig
                                  @johngordon I've never read that book, but it sounds familiar. It would be interesting to see how things stack up compared to a 1984 perspective. :-) Alas, there is no Kindle version. Might be too much trouble to get a physical copy. Bah. :-)
                                  duerig
                                    @clarkgoble But if it is driven by automation, then it might be more like retirement/child labor. A permanent change in the way that people work throughout their life. OTOH, I do not yet see the automation story in the data. @johngordon @oluseyi
                                    duerig
                                      @clarkgoble I claim that if mass disability is driven by globalization, that it is at worst something like the great depression. A bad thing for those who have to live through it, but not a new permanent normal. @johngordon @oluseyi
                                      duerig
                                        @clarkgoble But by contrast, our society has permanently reduced the working life of an individual both early in life (banning/limiting child labor) and later in life (normalizing retirement). @johngordon @oluseyi
                                        duerig
                                          @clarkgoble You're right that 'Temporary' can be a long time. Good comparison would be great depression vs. child labor/senior labor changes. Great depression was temporary, even though a decade long. Globalization could be like that. @johngordon @oluseyi